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Category: Legal Ethics

Privilege Waiver: Is Your File-Sharing Site a Public Park Bench?

While courts and the Federal Rules of Evidence take an increasingly pragmatic approach to the question of when inadvertent disclosure of privileged information results in waiver, a recent federal magistrate’s ruling serves as a potent warning that use of a file-sharing site – without sufficient safeguards – may constitute a waiver. Harleysville Insurance Co. v. Holding Funeral Home, Inc., No. 1:15-cv-00057 (W.D. Va. Feb. 9, 2017) is the first published decision to find that the use of a file-sharing site to exchange potentially privileged information constituted a waiver of the attorney-client privilege and work product protection—because the company failed to password protect its transmission.

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Indictment Issued in Law Firm Hacks

In what New York’s top federal prosecutor called a “wake-up call for law firms around the world,” three Chinese citizens have been charged with hacking into the servers of two prominent – but unidentified – international law firms to steal confidential client information in connection with pending M&A deals

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Law Firms and Vendors Mandated to Up Their Cyber Game: Final Installment in a 3-Part Series

This is our final installment in a three-part series examining the New York State Department of Financial Services (“DFS”) new cybersecurity regulation.  In this installment, we provide an overview of the regulation’s impact on third-party vendors and business partners, including law firms.

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Cyber Regulation Demands Board Accountability: Part 2 in a 3-Part Series

This is our second installment in a three-part series examining the New York State Department of Financial Services (“DFS”) new cybersecurity regulation.  In this installment, we provide an overview of the regulation’s impact on corporate governance and the scope of liability for corporate boards.

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Unpacking New York’s Cybersecurity Regulation: Part 1 in a 3-Part Series

This is the first installment in a three-part series examining the New York State Department of Financial Services (“DFS”) new cybersecurity regulation.  The Patterson Belknap Privacy and Data Security Team has studied the regulation, its legislative and regulatory underpinnings, and practical consequences.

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The Evolving Landscape of “Hacking Back” Against Cyber Attacks

Self-defense is a natural, almost reflexive human instinct.  But it has a complicated history in American law, full of contradiction and compromise.  Many jurisdictions have long recognized that an otherwise illegal act—such as taking a swing at a purse-snatcher—may be justifiable (and therefore legally permissible) in the context of fending off a physical threat or attack.  But victims of cyber-attacks—who may be tempted to “hack back”—have yet to enjoy such a privilege.  In fact, following through on this natural instinct in cyberspace could lead to criminal and civil liability.

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Welcome to Our Blog

We are pleased to announce the launch of Data Security Law Blog, Patterson Belknap’s newest resource for the latest news, analysis and thought leadership in the critical area of privacy and cybersecurity law.

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